Reasons for euthanasia

Top Regulating euthanasia Those in favour of euthanasia think that there is no reason why euthanasia can't be controlled by proper regulationbut they acknowledge that some problems will remain. For example, it will be difficult to deal with people who want to implement euthanasia for selfish reasons or pressurise vulnerable patients into dying. This is little different from the position with any crime.

Reasons for euthanasia

The arguments for euthanasia: Some believe that every patient has a right to choose when to die. Proponents believe that euthanasia can be safely regulated by government legislation. The arguments against euthanasia: Alternative treatments are available, such as palliative care and hospices.

We do not have to kill the patient to kill the symptoms. Nearly all pain can be relieved. In the Netherlands in around 1, patients were killed without their request. We could never truly control it.

Reasons for euthanasia

Reports from the Netherlands, where euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are legal, reveal that doctors do not always report it. The assumption that patients should have a right to die would impose on doctors a duty to kill, thus restricting the autonomy of the doctor.

Why say 'No' to Euthanasia? What about personal choice? The pro-euthanasia and assisted suicide lobby emphasise the importance of personal choice and autonomy. Assisted suicide is not a private act. Nobody chooses assisted suicide in isolation.

Euthanasia and assisted suicide are matters of public concern because they involve one person facilitating the death of another. Friends, relatives, healthcare staff and society are hugely affected by the wider ramifications of the process.

If you had a disease where the prognosis is not straightforward, dementia or a chronic but not terminal disease, then you would not meet the criteria; attempts to extend the law further would be almost inevitable. The pro-euthanasia and assisted suicide lobby will often present the view that helping someone else to end their life is the most loving and compassionate thing to do.

But surely the most compassionate thing to do is to care for a person at the end of their life and to show them that their life has tremendous value regardless of age or abilities.

Palliative care is an area of healthcare that focuses on relieving and preventing the suffering of patients. Britain is the only country in the world where palliative care is a recognised medical specialism.

What about the most vulnerable? Changing the law to allow euthanasia or assisted suicide will inevitably put pressure on vulnerable people to end their lives for fear of being a financial, emotional or care burden upon others.

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This would especially affect people who are disabled, elderly, sick or depressed. Some would face the added risk of coercion by others who might stand to gain from their deaths. Fear and anxiety would be promoted rather than Individual autonomy.

We were also concerned that vulnerable people — the elderly, lonely, sick or distressed — would feel pressure, whether real or imagined, to request early death.

We must never let the depressed, the confused, those in terrible pain, the aged and the vulnerable feel that they should pursue the path of assisted suicide so as not to be a burden on others.

Studies concerning the euthanasia and assisted suicide law in countries that have legalised such measures make for troubling reading. Another recent study found that nurses are regularly euthanasing their patients in Belgium even though the laws prohibits it. Since euthanasia was legalised in there has not been one attempt to prosecute for abuses of the euthanasia law.

In50 per cent of patients requesting suicide were assisted to die by a doctor who had been their physician for eight weeks or less. Not all people who are terminally ill wish to end their life There have been tragic cases of people suffering terminable illness who want other people to help them end their life.

It is important however that we do not lose sight of the large number of people who are terminally ill and have found richness and purpose in life despite the pain and hardship. A survey published by the British Medical Journal in found that the majority of patients who are almost completely paralysed but fully conscious have said they are happy and do not want to die.Jun 01,  · Euthanasia opponents further point out that there is a moral difference between decriminalising something, often for practical reasons like those mentioned above, and encouraging it.

Euthanasia, or 'mercy killing', is one of the most emotive and controversial issues in the healthcare sector today. It has been the subject of numerous debates and discussions, and still remains mired with strong arguments by its opponents and proponents. Animal euthanasia (euthanasia from Greek: εὐθανασία; "good death") is the act of putting an animal to death or allowing it to die by withholding extreme medical measures.

Reasons for euthanasia include incurable (and especially painful) conditions or diseases. Many reasons could push individuals or groups to encourage a patient to request euthanasia: For a government, it could be the desire to reduce health care spending; and for a family, the desire to do away with guilt or a duty to attend the patient; for heirs, a rush to .

Jun 01,  · The last two reasons why death is a bad thing are not absolute; if a person wants to die, then neither of those reasons can be used to say that they would be wrong to undergo euthanasia.

Animal euthanasia (euthanasia from Greek: εὐθανασία; "good death") is the act of putting an animal to death or allowing it to die by withholding extreme medical measures. Reasons for euthanasia include incurable (and especially painful) conditions or diseases. The arguments for euthanasia: 1. We need it - 'the compassion argument'. Supporters of euthanasia believe that allowing people to ‘die with dignity’ is kinder than forcing them to . Jun 01,  · Euthanasia opponents further point out that there is a moral difference between decriminalising something, often for practical reasons like those mentioned above, and encouraging it.

The arguments for euthanasia: 1. We need it - 'the compassion argument'. Supporters of euthanasia believe that allowing people to ‘die with dignity’ is kinder than forcing them to .

Euthanasia - Wikipedia