Made martin luther king jr s have dream speech effective

Background View from the Lincoln Memorial toward the Washington Monument on August 28, The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was partly intended to demonstrate mass support for the civil rights legislation proposed by President Kennedy in June. Martin Luther King and other leaders therefore agreed to keep their speeches calm, also, to avoid provoking the civil disobedience which had become the hallmark of the Civil Rights Movement.

Made martin luther king jr s have dream speech effective

This article is the latest in a series of video speech critiques which help you analyze and learn from excellent speeches.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Made martin luther king jr s have dream speech effective

Read the analysis in this speech critique; Study the speech text in the complete transcript; and Share your thoughts on this presentation. Much of the greatness of this speech is tied to its historical context, a topic which goes beyond the scope of this article.

Emphasize Phrases by Repeating at the Beginning of Sentences Anaphora repeating words at the beginning of neighbouring clauses is a commonly used rhetorical device. Repeating the words twice sets the pattern, and further repetitions emphasize the pattern and increase the rhetorical effect. But this is just one of eight occurrences of anaphora in this speech.

By order of introduction, here are the key phrases: The most commonly used noun is freedom, which is used twenty times in the speech. This makes sense, since freedom is one of the primary themes of the speech. Consider these commonly repeated words: Utilize Appropriate Quotations or Allusions Evoking historic and literary references is a powerful speechwriting technique which can be executed explicitly a direct quotation or implicitly allusion.

Consider the allusions used by Martin Luther King Jr.: Weeping may linger for the night, but joy comes with the morning. One way that Martin Luther King Jr. This is not accidental; mentioning Mississippi would evoke some of the strongest emotions and images for his audience.

Additionally, King uses relatively generic geographic references to make his message more inclusive: Use Metaphors to Highlight Contrasting Concepts Metaphors allow you to associate your speech concepts with concrete images and emotions. To highlight the contrast between two abstract concepts, consider associating them with contrasting concrete metaphors.

For example, to contrast segregation with racial justice, King evokes the contrasting metaphors of dark and desolate valley of segregation and sunlit path of racial justice.

The formatting has been added by me, not by MLK, to highlight words or phrases which are analyzed above. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice.

It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.I have a dream that my four little chi1dre!Il will one day live in a nation \Vhere they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the conte·nt of the,ir initiativeblog.com{!.te,r.l I have.

Martin Luther King "I Have a Dream" When thinking of the most effective and well known speeches in history, one of the first speeches that comes to mind is Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream.". The famous words spoken by Martin Luther King Jr. made an impact from the moment they were uttered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug.

28, "Watch the 50th Anniversary of MLK's "I. Aug 28,  · The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, which turns 50 on Wednesday, exerts a potent hold on people across generations.

Martin Luther King"I Have a Dream"When thinking of the most effective and well known speeches in history, one of the first speeches that comes to mind is Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream." A large part of Martin Luther King Jr.'s success as an /5(6).

“I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King Jr.

Speech Critique – I Have a Dream – Martin Luther King Jr.

is one of the most memorable speeches of all time. It is worthy of lengthy study as we can all learn speechwriting skills from King’s historic masterpiece.

This article is the latest in a series of video speech critiques which help you analyze and.

Speech Analysis: I Have a Dream - Martin Luther King Jr.